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Romantic Rachmaninoff at the Potter Center
Saturday, February 13

February 13, 2021 @ 7:30 pm


 

Romantic Rachmaninoff

Join the JSO for a Valentine’s celebration featuring Rachmaninoff’s famous 2nd piano concerto. Internationally renowned pianist Inon Barnatan joins the JSO. We continue to explore the symphony after Beethoven with a performance of Sibelius’ 5th which praises the natural world. Of the 5th, Sibelius said, “It is as if God Almighty had thrown down pieces of a mosaic for heaven’s floor and asked me to find out what was the original pattern.”

Preconcert Conversation @ 6:30pm

Join us for a free, interactive lecture on this evening’s featured music.

 

Program Schedule

ALEXANDER BORODIN
In the Steppes of Central Asia
In the Steppes of Central Asia had been intended to be presented as one of several tableaux vivants to celebrate the silver anniversary of the reign of Emperor Alexander II of Russia, who had done much to expand the Russian Empire eastward.

Read more on Wikipedia

JEAN SIBELIUS
Symphony No. 5 in E-flat major, Op. 82
Sibelius was commissioned to write the symphony by the Finnish government in honour of his 50th birthday, 8 December 1915, which had been declared a national holiday. The symphony was originally composed in 1915; it was revised in 1916 and 1919.

Read more on Wikipedia

———Intermission———

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF
Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18
Inon Barnatan, piano
The Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, is a concerto for piano and orchestra composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff between the autumn of 1900 and April 1901. The second and third movements were first performed with the composer as soloist on 2 December 1900.

Read more on Wikipedia

Runtime: 1H 30M

 

Music Preview


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“One of the most admired pianists of his generation” (New York Times), Inon Barnatan is celebrated for his poetic sensibility, musical intelligence, and consummate artistry. He inaugurates his tenure as Music Director of California’s La Jolla Music Society Summerfest in July 2019. The coming season brings the release of a two-volume set of Beethoven’s complete piano concertos, which he recorded for Pentatone with Alan Gilbert and London’s Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. Barnatan’s upcoming concerto collaborations include Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 with Nicholas McGegan and the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue and Ravel’s G-major Concerto with the Chicago Symphony, Rachmaninov’s Third Concerto with Gilbert and the Royal Stockholm Symphony, Clara Schumann’s Concerto with the New Jersey Symphony, and a recreation of Beethoven’s legendary 1808 concert, which featured the world premieres of his Fourth Piano Concerto, Choral Fantasy, and Fifth and Sixth Symphonies, with Louis Langrée and the Cincinnati Symphony. Barnatan also plays Mendelssohn, Gershwin, and Thomas Adès for his solo recital debut at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall, returns to Alice Tully Hall with Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and reunites with his frequent recital partner, cellist Alisa Weilerstein, for tours on both sides of the Atlantic. The first takes them to London’s Wigmore Hall and other venues in England, the Netherlands and Italy for Brahms and Shostakovich, while the second sees them celebrate Beethoven’s 250th anniversary with performances of his complete cello sonatas in San Francisco and other U.S. cities.

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Barnatan’s 2018-19 orchestral highlights included Beethoven’s Fourth Concerto with Gilbert and the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, a complete Beethoven concerto cycle with New Jersey’s Princeton Symphony, Rachmaninov with the Pittsburgh Symphony and Israel Philharmonic, Copland with the Oregon Symphony, and Mozart with the Houston Symphony and the Australian Chamber Orchestra at Lincoln Center. Solo recitals took him to Boston’s Celebrity Series, Seattle’s Benaroya Hall, and London’s Southbank Centre, where he made his International Piano Series debut with a program of Ravel and Mussorgsky. In addition to performances with the Dover Quartet and St. Lawrence Quartet at Carnegie Hall, his chamber highlights included national tours with the Calidore Quartet and with Alisa Weilerstein, violinist Sergey Khachatryan, and percussionist Colin Currie. This summer, in his first season as Artistic Director of the La Jolla Music Society SummerFest, Barnatan explores the theme of transformation through programs which explore evolution in music, and collaborates with Grammy-winning jazz vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant, visionary director and visual artist Doug Fitch, the Mark Morris Dance Group, and other artistic luminaries in a series devoted to cross-disciplinary exploration.

A regular performer with many of the world’s foremost orchestras and conductors, Barnatan served from 2014-17 as the inaugural Artist-in-Association of the New York Philharmonic. In summer 2017, he made his BBC Proms debut with the BBC Symphony at London’s Royal Albert Hall and gave the Aspen world premiere of a new piano concerto by Alan Fletcher, which he went on to reprise with the Atlanta Symphony and in a season-opening concert with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. Recent orchestral debuts include the Chicago, Baltimore, Fort Worth, Indianapolis, Nashville, San Diego, and Seattle Symphony Orchestras, as well as the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra and the London, Helsinki, Hong Kong, and Royal Stockholm Philharmonics. Other recent highlights include a complete Beethoven concerto cycle in Marseilles; performances of Copland’s Piano Concerto with the San Francisco Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas in San Francisco and at Carnegie Hall; and a U.S. tour with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, playing and conducting Mozart and Shostakovich from the keyboard and premiering a newly commissioned concerto by Alasdair Nicolson. With the Minnesota Orchestra and Osmo Vänskä, Barnatan played Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto on New Year’s Eve, followed by a Midwest tour that culminated in Chicago, and a return to the BBC Proms in summer 2018.

Barnatan is the recipient of both a prestigious 2009 Avery Fisher Career Grant and Lincoln Center’s 2015 Martin E. Segal Award, which recognizes “young artists of exceptional accomplishment.” A sought-after chamber musician, he was a member of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s CMS Two program from 2006 to 2009, and continues to make regular CMS appearances in New York and on tour. His passion for contemporary music sees him commission and perform many works by living composers, including premieres of pieces by Thomas Adès, Sebastian Currier, Avner Dorman, Alan Fletcher, Joseph Hallman, Alasdair Nicolson, Andrew Norman, Matthias Pintscher, and others. He has given multiple solo recitals at internationally acclaimed venues including New York’s 92nd Street Y, the Celebrity Series of Boston, Chicago’s Harris Theater, the Vancouver Recital Society, and London’s Southbank Centre and Wigmore Hall. Last season, he gave collaborative recitals at Carnegie Hall and Philadelphia’s Kimmel Center with soprano Renée Fleming, and in both 2016 and 2018 he collaborated with the Mark Morris Dance Group at New York’s Mostly Mozart Festival.

Barnatan’s most recent album release is a live recording of Messiaen’s 90-minute masterpiece Des canyons aux étoiles (“From the Canyons to the Stars”), in which he played the exceptionally challenging solo piano part at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. In 2015 he released Rachmaninov & Chopin: Cello Sonatas on Decca Classics with Alisa Weilerstein, earning rave reviews on both sides of the Atlantic. His most recent solo recording, of Schubert’s late piano sonatas, was released by Avie in September 2013, winning praise from such publications as Gramophone and BBC Music, while his account of the great A-major Sonata (D. 959) was chosen by BBC Radio 3 as one of the all-time best recordings of the piece. His 2012 album, Darknesse Visible, debuted in the Top 25 on the Billboard Traditional Classical chart and received universal critical acclaim, being named BBC Music’s “Instrumentalist CD of the Month” and winning a coveted place on the New York Times’ “Best of 2012” list. He made his solo recording debut with a Schubert album, released by Bridge Records in 2006, that prompted Gramophone to hail him as “a born Schubertian” and London’s Evening Standard to call him “a true poet of the keyboard: refined, searching, unfailingly communicative.”

Born in Tel Aviv in 1979, Inon Barnatan started playing the piano at the age of three, when his parents discovered his perfect pitch, and made his orchestral debut at eleven. His musical education connects him to some of the 20th century’s most illustrious pianists and teachers: he studied first with Professor Victor Derevianko, a student of the Russian master Heinrich Neuhaus, before moving to London in 1997 to study at the Royal Academy of Music with Christopher Elton and Maria Curcio, a student of the legendary Artur Schnabel. Leon Fleisher has also been an influential teacher and mentor. Barnatan currently resides in New York City.

 


 

Details

Date:
February 13, 2021
Time:
7:30 pm
Event Category:

Venue

Potter Center
2111 Emmons Rd.
Jackson, MI 49201 United States
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If you’re reading this page, that means you’re hopefully joining us soon for a concert, and we love that. We care a LOT about making sure people who are newer to classical music and/or orchestra concerts have a great experience. If you have a question that isn’t answered below please contact us at info@jacksonsymphony.org we want to ensure you have an amazing experience.

What do I wear?
More than anything, we want you to be comfortable when you join us for a concert, so dress in a way that works for you. Some people love dressing up and going out—if that’s you go for it. If you prefer to be more casual, that’s fine too. You won’t be the only one dressed casually, either. You will see everything from jeans to suits and ties. In short, you do you, and we’re just glad you’re joining us.

When do I applaud?
This is tricky. The tradition is that you wait until the conclusion of the work, last movement in the case of symphonies, concertos, etc. On the other hand, no pun intended, you should feel comfortable expressing your response to the music whenever you feel moved to do so. A safe out is to wait until others start.

Do I need to know anything about classical music to enjoy the concert?
Not at all. Music is the language of the spirit as much as the mind. The universal language speaks directly to the listener, no interpreter necessary, enjoy! For a more in depth look at the music being performed, all concert goers can attend the free pre-concert conversation “Backstage Glimpses” hosted by Dr. Bruce Brown, JSO Composer in Residence. The conversation takes place at 6:30 pm .Dr. Brown leads a lively, enlightening and informative look at the evening’s repertoire. Guest Artists are generally present to give a brief talk on the music they will be performing and to answer audience questions. You can also listen to the concert playlist on Spotify. Compiled by Music Director Matthew Aubin, the playlist is full of his top picks of the best recordings of the pieces we will be playing.

Can I bring my child to an evening concert?
Children are welcome to attend all our events provided that they are supervised by an adult. Every child must have a ticket. Child/student ticket prices are only $5. For a family with small children we encourage you to attend a rehearsal. Phone the JSO office, (517) 782-3221 x117 for details.

How can I support the JSO?
The ways are numerous including annual fund, endowment, planned giving, volunteering and several more. Please click here for more information. The JSO is a 501(c)3, so any donation you make to the JSO is a tax deductible donation to the full extent provided by law.

Can I take photographs during the concert?
Photographing or taping JSO concerts is strictly prohibited. No recording devices or cameras are permitted without special authorization from the JSO.

Can I rent the JSO Downtown Music Center for functions?
Yes, our facility at 215 W. Michigan has proved to be an excellent venue for recitals, business meetings and even memorial services. Please contact us to learn more.

Can I hire orchestra musicians to play at an event?
Some of our musicians do perform at weddings and other special functions. Please contact the Orchestra Personnel Manager at: jacksonsymphonypm@gmail.com.

If I arrive to a concert late, will I be seated immediately?
The JSO makes every attempt to begin concerts on time. In deference to the comfort and listening pleasure of the audience in the hall, latecomers will not be seated until after the conclusion of the first work on the program, and there will be no seating break during any work. Patrons who leave the hall before or during a work will not be reseated until after the work is completed. Your usher will alert you as soon as it is possible to be seated. House lights are dimmed to indicate that the concert is about to begin.

How can I find out if a concert has been cancelled due to inclement weather?
To find out if a scheduled JSO performance has been cancelled due to inclement weather, hazardous roads, power outages and the like, call the box office at 517-782-3221 x117.

I’ve misplaced my tickets for tomorrow’s concert, what should I do?
If subscription tickets are lost, call (517)782-3221 x117. The JSO will verify the purchase through its records. Subscribers may then pick up an entry pass at the box office prior to the concert. These passes cannot be exchanged. The lost ticket policy does not apply to tickets already exchanged. (If they call the day before the concert, we write passes which the guest picks up at our “will call” table at JC after 6:30 PM the night of the concert.)

Can I donate my unused tickets?
Ticket holders unable to use or exchange their tickets are encouraged to call the JSO Box Office at (517)782-3221, ext. 117, at least 24 hours in advance of the concert. The value of each ticket can be used as a tax-deductible contribution. The JSO will send a donation letter and a CD of the missed performance to the donor.

Can I leave my cellphone on during a concert?
Cellular phones, pagers and alarm watches should be turned off while in the hall. Patrons should ask for the House Manager to report an emergency during a concert, or to make special arrangements to receive emergency phone calls during a concert. The JSO appreciates the audience’s cooperation in avoiding any extraneous sounds during the concerts. The hall microphones used to record the orchestra are extremely sensitive and will even record the sound of a wristwatch chime.

Does the JSO provide discounted ticket prices for groups?
Special rates are available for groups of 10 or more. Call (517) 782-3221 for details.

Can I do volunteer work for the JSO?
To volunteer for fund-raising projects and other exciting events, visit our volunteer page by clicking here or contact the JSO office at (517) 782-3221.

Where should I eat before a concert?
Several fine restaurants are located in Jackson;

I’m coming in from out of town, is there any place to eat close by?”
A full list of restaurants in the Jackson area can be found at the Experience Jackson website. Options within walking distance of The Wax include Bella Note, Chilango’s Burrito Bar, Chilango’s Chop House, Grand River Brewery, Night Light, and The Chase Sports Bar.

How about a hotel that’s nearby?
There are many hotel options within easy driving distance of The Wax. A full list of Jackson area hotels can be found by clicking here (you will be redirected to the Experience Jackson website).

What time does the concert start?
Unless otherwise noted on our website, all of our concerts start at 8:00. Doors to The Wax will open 30 minutes prior to the start of the show.

I’d like to bring my child(ren) to the concert, do I need to buy a ticket for them?
We think music is a universal experience and should be shared by those of all ages, so children are welcome at The Wax, but they do need a ticket unless they are small enough to sit in a lap during the concert. Also, since our room provides an intimate listening experience, we ask that children be able to sit quietly for the duration of the show (generally 75 to 90 minutes).

Where should I park?
There is plentiful street parking around our building and there are also Jackson City Parking Lots available on West Michigan Avenue, just east of South Jackson and just west of Mechanic Streets or on Pearl Street, just east of Blackstone and just west of South Jackson Streets.

I’ve bought tickets, but now can’t come to the concert; can I get a refund?
Unfortunately we are unable to offer refunds for concert tickets.

The weather is really bad; will the concert still take place?
In the rare event that a concert is cancelled we will immediately post a notification on our website along with any information about possibly rescheduling or refund information.

I (or my business) would like to be involved in the Music on Tap Series; are sponsorship opportunities available?
Sponsorship opportunities are available at many different levels. For more information, please click here to see our Support page.

We have special seating needs, is The Wax accessible?
The Wax is fully accessible. If you know you are coming to the show and you have accessibility needs, please contact us in advance so that we can make sure you are accommodated.

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